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Last Grill of Summer – Lamb Chops and Summer Veg

Before summer officially turns to fall, there are still a few grilling and eating al fresco days left on the calendar and while beautiful summer vegetables are still coming into the markets here’s a recipe that rolls it all into one.  Try this simple, but delicious recipe for Grilled Lamb Chops and Tian Provencal from popular blogger, Dad Cooks Dinner.  You’ll think you’ve been transported to Peter Mayle’s patio in Provence! Share this Post:Digg this postRecommend on FacebookShare with StumblersTweet about itSubscribe to the comments on this postBookmark in Browser

Fourth of July Recipes: On The Grill!

The outdoor grill never met a better partner than a SousVide Supreme water oven!  Pre-cooking meat, chicken, fish, seafood, and vegetables in advance and finishing on the grill gives the backyard chef the luxury of bringing all the food together at once without the hassle of juggling the timing of different types of food or the worry of burning or risk of undercooking the food. Try the latest addition to our collection of great rib recipes, BBQ Pork Ribs from Steve Cylka of the UK blog The Black Peppercorn or any of our perennial grill-finished favorites: Kicked Up Burgers, Pork Belly Sliders,Chocolate Chili Barbecue Chicken, Lemongrass … Read More

Infusing Oils With SousVide Supreme

This summer preserve the sunshine with SousVide Supreme by infusing olive oil with your favorite herbs and spices. Instantly add a burst of flavor to your meals by drizzling sous-vide-infused oil over risotto, meat, fish, poultry, vegetables or fresh berries. A SousVide Supreme water oven is the perfect tool for infusions because it injects full flavor into the oil in just a few hours, as opposed to having to let the mixture sit for several days at room temperature or altering the flavor of the olive oil by heating too vigorously on a traditional stove-top. In just three short hours you will … Read More

Spring Sunchokes

Sunchokes, also named Jerusalem artichokes, are not artichokes nor are they from Jerusalem. Native to North America, this tuber looks like a cross between a potato and ginger root. It is the root of a tall, perennial sunflower and can be eaten raw or cooked. When cooked it has a sweet and nutty artichoke-like flavor; when eaten raw it is crisp and akin to a water chestnut. This vegetable can be a bit finicky to cook, if left unattended, as it changes in texture quickly: one minute it’s firm and the next minute you’ll have a bowl of mush. Fear … Read More

The ChamRock Cocktail

Makes 1 INGREDIENTS 1 ounce (30 ml) sous vide infused ginger syrup, well chilled 1 ounce (30 ml) Midori melon liqueur, well chilled 2 ounces (60 ml) champagne or prosecco, well chilled DIRECTIONS Put the ingredients in order into a champagne flute. Enjoy!  Slainte   Share this Post:Digg this postRecommend on FacebookShare with StumblersTweet about itSubscribe to the comments on this postBookmark in Browser

Pickled Sous Vide Vegetables

Courtesy of SousVide Supreme Culinary Specialist, Madeline Fiore We use radishes or asparagus here, but any fresh spring vegetables will work as will those that come on later in the year. Pickle root vegetables, such as carrots or beets, as you would the radishes and tender vegetables, such as mushrooms, cucumbers, cauliflower or green beans, as you would the asparagus. Vegetables should be cut no more than 1/2″ (1.25 cm) thick in wedges or batons. INGREDIENTS 12 ounces (340g) radishes (trimmed, unpeeled, quartered) OR asparagus (woody ends trimmed) 2/3 cup (160ml) white wine vinegar 2/3 cup (160ml) water 3 tablespoons … Read More

Ahi Poached in Duck Fat L’Orange with Caramelized Figs

Courtesy of Linda Miller Nicholson, SaltySeattle.com Serves 4 INGREDIENTS 1 pound (454 g) block sushi-grade ahi tuna (COLD) Kosher salt and pepper 4 tablespoons (57 g) duck fat, solid 2 organic oranges, one for juice and zest, one for slices 2 tablespoons (30 ml) honey 1 tablespoon (15 ml) champagne vinegar 4 figs, quartered ¼ cup (60 ml) duck stock (use chicken, if duck is not on hand) DIRECTIONS Fill and preheat SousVide Supreme water oven to 138F/59C Pat the tuna dry and season it with salt and pepper. Put the tuna into a cooking pouch along with duck fat … Read More

Share Your Sous Vide Story Contest

  Tell us why you like cooking sous vide –or, if you don’t have a sous vide machine–why you would like to cook sous vide, for a chance to win $200 towards SousVide Supreme’s online store and a copy of the highly-acclaimed Modernist Cuisine at Home book!   Here are some sample questions and ideas to get you started: What was your sous vide AHA! moment? What piqued your interest in sous vide cooking? Tell us about your sous vide holiday experience. Have you ever taken your sous vide machine on the road? Any attempts at making  your own sous … Read More

Sous Vide Turkey Makes Holiday Cooking Easy

If you have a spare 10 minutes of hands-on time, you can turn out the most succulent, juicy, perfectly cooked white turkey meat you’ve ever eaten.  OK.  We’re not talking actual cooking time; that’s about 2 to 4 unattended hours. But isn’t your hands-on time what really matters?  When you’re up to your eyebrows in tasks to get ready for Thanksgiving or Christmas dinner, who needs the stress of timing, basting, and keeping the eagle eye on the bird to avoid culinary disaster?  You’ve got better things to do than be a slave to the stove. Take a look at how … Read More

Sous Vide Rhubarb Compote

Makes 1/2 cup (120 ml) ?? stalks rhubarb, sous-vide cooked 1 ounce (30 ml) Rhubarb Rose Syrup 1. Put the rhubarb and syrup into a blender or food processor fitted with a steel blade and puree to as chunky or smooth a consistency as you desire. 2. Store in an air-tight jar, in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks. 3. Stir it into yogurt, warm it slightly to pour over pistachio or vanilla ice-cream, place a dollop on panna cotta, use as a filling for hand-pies or add a bit to your next cheese plate. Share this Post:Digg this … Read More

Tips & Tricks | Pouch Liquor: Pure Culinary Gold for Sauces

One of the elements that makes a meat dish transcendant is a velvety sauce. And nothing makes a better sauce than the concentrated broth of the meat itself – in French, the fond. In the pan, it’s the brown bits of caramelized meat juices that stick to the bottom. In the sous vide pouch, it’s the concentrated liquid that accumulates during cooking. Strain it and use it, like the pure culinary gold that it is, au naturel or as the base for a sauce. Making a sauce is simple and demands only these basic elements: fat, aromatics, and liquid (broth, … Read More

Queso Blanco Dip Sous Vide

Serves 4 to 6 Ingredients 1-1/2 cups (195 g) asadero or Chihuahua cheese*, finely shredded 4 ounces (113 g) diced green chilies 1/4 cup (60 ml) half-and-half 2 tablespoons (20 g) onion, grated 2 teaspoons (10 ml) ground cumin 1/2 teaspoon (2.5 ml) salt 1 serrano pepper, stemmed and finely chopped (seeds optional to your liking)  Instructions Fill and preheat the SousVide Supreme to 175F/80C. Put all ingredients into a large (gallon/3.8 liter) zip-closure cooking pouch and use the displacement method (Archimedes’ Principle) to remove the air and zip the seal. Submerge the pouch in the water bath to cook for about 30 minutes, … Read More